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Employment Law Blog

Categories: Employee Benefits

Employers Need To Protect Themselves From Expected Next Wave Of Employment Claims

September 30, 2019

While not a new issue, the next wave of employment claims will likely be led by state and federal departments of labor pursuing claims against employers for misclassifying as independent contractors workers who meet the test for being employees.

By classifying employees as independent contractors employers are able to avoid paying various benefits to these workers, ignore the minimum wage and overtime laws, deprive them of state and federal Family Leave laws and social security, and avoid unemployment claims. Misclassification denies states and the federal government many millions of dollars in revenues each year.  States and the federal government have attempted to crack down on these abuses in the past, but now, with so much revenue at stake, their efforts are likely to take hold to many employers’ financial detriment.

What distinguishes an independent contractor from an employee?  Courts and the government had looked at whether the workers’ services are an integral part of the business, the permanency of the parties’ relationship, the contractor’s investment in facilities and equipment, the degree of control exercised over the worker, whether the worker has an opportunity for profits and losses, whether the worker exercises judgement and initiative and whether the party providing the services does so through an independent business organization or operation.  New Jersey now applies the ABC test.  For an employer to establish that a worker is an independent contractor it must satisfy all three prongs, namely (A) that the worker is free from control or direction from the employer, (B) that the worker is providing a service outside the usual course of the employer’s business or is performing that work outside of all places of that business and (C) that the individual is customarily engaged in an independent trade, occupation or business.

In 2017 legislation was proposed entitled the Payroll Fraud Prevention Act.  It was to amend the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) and make it unlawful for any person to (1) discharge or discriminate against any employee who files a complaint with respect to his or her employment classification or (2) wrongfully classify employees as non-employees.  The legislation sought to impose double the amount of liquidated damages already provided for under the FLSA.  The legislation was never passed.  However, shortly after New Jersey Governor Murphy took office he created a task force on the subject, which issued a report and recommendations in July of this year.  The report recommends legislative action to increase fines for misclassification, assess employers the costs of any investigation and hold business owners personally liable.  The New Jersey Department of Labor (“NJDOL”) also entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with the United States Department of Labor (“USDOL”) to work together to go after employers who misclassify their workforce.

There has also been a steady increase in civil litigation dealing with worker misclassification.  These suits often are brought as class actions and the damages can be large.  Damages can include the failure to pay overtime, employment tax contributions (for example, social security contributions) and unemployment.  Employers should have experienced counsel review their relationship with contractors and review any written agreements that may be in place, prior to getting the proverbial knock on the door by the NJDOL or the USDOL.

Attorney: Steven Adler
Related Practice: Labor and Employment
Category: Wage & Hour, Employee Benefits

1099 vs. W2

March 25, 2019

The New Jersey Department of Labor and the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs have reminded employers that under N.J.S.A. 43:21-1 et seq., the New Jersey Unemployment Compensation Law (NJUCL), if a service is performed for remuneration or under any contract of hire, written or oral, express or implied, it is considered to be covered employment, unless the potential employer is able to establish the following with regard to the service at issue and the individual providing that service:

(A) Such individual has been and will continue to be free from control or direction over the performance of such service, both under his contract of service and in fact; and
(B) Such service is either outside the usual course of the business for which such service is performed, or that such service is performed outside of all the places of business of the enterprise for which such service is performed; and
(C) Such individual is customarily engaged in an independently established trade, occupation, profession or business.

N.J.S.A. 43:21-19(i)(6).

This statutory criteria, commonly referred to as the "ABC test", is written in the conjunctive. Therefore, where a putative employer fails to meet any one of the three criteria listed above with regard to an individual who has performed a service for remuneration, that individual is considered to be an employee and the service performed is considered to be employment subject to the requirements of the NJUCL; in particular, subject to N.J.S.A. 43:21-7, which requires an employer to make contributions to the unemployment compensation fund and the State disability benefits fund with respect to its employees.

In the event that the State determines an “Independent Contractor” is really an employee, the employer will be responsible for payroll taxes and unemployment contributions for the misclassified employee. If the employer maintains any benefit plans such as 401(K) or medical, the misclassified employee may have retroactive claims for benefits.

If you are contacted by the New Jersey Department of Labor or the United States Department of Labor, the attorneys at Mandelbaum Salsburg are happy to be of assistance and have extensive experience in dealing with these examinations.

Attorney: Martin Hauptman
Related Practice: Labor and Employment
Category: Employee Benefits

Time To Review Your Company's Personnel Policy

November 14, 2018

As the weather gets colder and the days shorter, the end of the year can’t be too far away. Now is a good time to start reviewing your Company’s personnel policies so that your house can be in order to start the new year.

Here are a few questions for your HR team to answer to determine whether you need outside counsel to review your personnel policies and practices:
  1. When was the last time your Employee Manual was reviewed? There have been a number of significant changes in the law that might impact your policies.
  2. Does your Company’s sick leave policy comply with NJ’s paid sick leave law? The new law took effect October 29th.
  3. Has the Company reviewed its pay policies? There were significant changes this year in New Jersey concerning equal pay. In just the past few days Hewlett Packard was hit with a gender pay gap lawsuit.
  4. Do you have a workforce in New York state? If so, has your Company provided them with mandatory sexual harassment prevention training? Has your Company issued a compliant policy? This law became effective October 9th and applies to all employers. It requires annual training. New Jersey also requires training of managers and staff members.
  5. Does your Company require employees to arbitrate disputes? When was the last time your arbitration policy was reviewed? There have been some significant changes in this area. Both Google and Facebook recently announced that they will not require employees to arbitrate sexual harassment claims.
  6. Does your Company require releases when severance is paid? Do the agreements require confidentiality? If so, it might interfere with the Company being able to deduct the severance payments as a business expense.
The Labor & Employment Law Group at the Firm is available to answer any questions you may have or help bring your Company into compliance.

Attorney: Steven Adler
Related Practice: Labor and Employment
Category: Employee Benefits

It Is Time To Take Your Company's Temperature Concerning HR Compliance

May 29, 2018

How healthy is your Company? Does it comply with all of its obligations under ever-expanding employment laws? Considering all of the recent developments in New Jersey and New York employment law, now is an appropriate time to take your Company’s temperature.

If your Company has an employee manual, now is the time to update it especially considering that New Jersey and New York recently passed legislation dealing with paid sick leave which may impact your current sick leave policy.

As a result of the #Metoo movement, and as reported recently in this blog, there have been significant changes concerning having employees sign settlement agreements in sexual harassment cases or separation agreements containing non-disclosure/confidentiality provisions waiving these claims. Both New York and federal law have changed in this regard. It is, therefore, important to review any form releases your Company uses when terminating employees.

As also reported previously in this blog, the law also has changed concerning equal pay. In New Jersey, it will not only apply to women who are paid less than men but also all other protected classes in the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination. It is, therefore, important to take your Company’s temperature with regard to employee pay.

Lastly, based upon an executive order recently signed by Governor Murphy organizing a task force to review the issue of misclassification of workers, we expect a crackdown on employers who misclassify workers as independent contractors. Now is the time to review those relationships as well.

In summary, having experienced legal counsel help in taking your Company’s temperature now will enable your Company to avoid costly litigation not too far down the road.

Attorney: Steven Adler
Related Practice: Labor and Employment
Category: Employee Benefits